Thursday, August 25, 2016

Tiny Houses and Miniature Landscape Quilts

At the recent 2016 International Quilt Invitation Exhibition in Brigham City, Utah, we fell in love with the tiny house quilts created by Stephanie Crawford (UK) and the small landscape quilts by Mary Ann Hildebrand (Texas).  We hope you enjoy these incredible miniature works of art as much as we did!

Please note: We're continuously posting free patterns on Twitter !
We're also selling beautiful quilt books at low introductory prices on e-Bay!

Fantasy in the Style of George Birrell by Stephanie Crawford (United Kingdom)




Black and White Building at the Tower of London by Stephanie Crawford


The window mullions and the wrought iron fence were created with machine stitching:



You can get an idea of the size of these tiny quilts in the photo below.  They were displayed on the end of a post.  Stephanie Crawford's Black-and-White Building is shown below her Sea Front at Brexill-on-Sea, which we featured in a previous post:


The Vaults at Fountains Abbey by Stephanie Crawford


We felt as if we were drawn into these vaults, thanks to the perspective, depth and texture which Stephanie Crawford created through her thread painting:



Life on the Mesa by Mary Ann Hildebrand (Texas)


Check out the way in which Mary Ann Hildebrand used batiks to represent the texture of the buildings and rocks:


Life on the Mesa previously won 1st place in the art-miniature category at the 2013 Houston International Quilt Festival.  It is shown in situ, below, at the Brigham City Museum:


Japanese Tea Garden by Mary Ann Hildebrand




In the photo below, Japanese Tea Garden is shown on display; to the right is Spring Crocuses by Jan P. Krentz:



Image credits:  Photos were taken by Quilt Inspiration at the Brigham City Museum (August, 2016).  We really appreciated the excellent lighting as well as the quality of the work within this show.

Thursday, August 18, 2016

2016 International Invitational Quilt Exhibition - Part 2

The 2016 International Quilt Invitation Exhibition in Brigham City, Utah, contained so many gorgeous art quilts. Come along with us on our road trip, as we show you some highlights !

Please note: We're continuously posting free patterns on Twitter !

We're also selling beautiful quilt books at low introductory prices on e-Bay!

Dragon Dance by Laurie Miller, Missouri


Although it was an original pattern, artist Meilo So graciously gave Laurie permission to use her watercolor artwork to create Dragon Dance for the 2014 Hoffman Challenge. One of Laurie's challenges was to create an interesting background without overwhelming the dragon.  A subtle movement in the quilt was created by using the tessellating pinwheel pattern with McKenna Ryan's Sand in My Shoes fabric, along with other monochromatic fabrics.

Close-up, Dragon Dance


We love the images of these joyous, dancing children who celebrate as they carry the dragon along! Laurie explains that the dragon was first appliqued to separate piece of fabric and then to the background.

Tidal Images by Gloria Loughman, Australia


Gloria lives by the sea on the Bellarine Peninsula in Victoria, Australia. She has had he opportunity to travel to many parts of the continent known in some areas for its iconic sun, surf, and sand. The daily ebb and flow of the waters of the ocean viewed during her Australian adventures are captured in this lovely quilt.

Close-up, Tidal Images


We think that Gloria blends these pure, clear colors so expertly that her work resembles an impressionist watercolor painting ! The curved, winding branches of the tree form a fascinating juxtaposition with its triangular leaves and the geometric forms of the mountains.

That Secret by Denise Tallon Havlan, Illinois


The "common threads" running through Havlan's work are a love of the human form, an appreciation of different cultures- ancient and contemporary- and their celebration of color. She is drawn to indigenous people and the decorations adorning their bodies.

Close-up, That Secret

Denise notes that the influence of 19th century French painter Paul Gauguin and his bold colors in depicting Polynesian people can be seen in her work here.  Prior to Polynesians wearing colorful sarongs, feathers, flowers, and plants were used to create color that was both beautiful and spiritually significant. With the introduction of trade cloth, the islands used bright fabrics on a daily basis. We really admire the very lifelike, realistic depiction of these two women, especially the feathered fan,  hair, floral adornments, and facial expressions.

Postcards From Jerusalem by Jenny Bowker, Australia 
 

Three major religions are represented in this quilt. The floor where the postcards are scattered is similar to the design of the floor in front of the cross at Calvary in the Christian Church of the Holy Sepulchre. The border design wraps around the mosque of the Dome of the Rock, just inside its outer walls. It encloses the Jewish Holy of Holies , the Muslim site of Mohammed's ascent to heaven, and the account from the  Old Testament of  Abraham and Issac.  In one quilt, Jenny has succeeded in displaying a great deal of history and culture.

Close-up, Postcards From Jerusalem


In her quilt, Jenny says that she wants to convey a sense of the golden magic of Jerusalem as well as the peace that still seeps from its stones, despite the turmoil and fighting that have plagued it for the last two thousand years. We are impressed that Jenny has done a wonderful job of depicting Jerusalem, one of the most fascinating cities of the world. 

Sea Front at Bexhill-On-Sea by Stephanie Crawford, United Kingdom 


When Stephanie designed this tiny quilt, her focus was on sunlight and perspective, which is why she adapted to fabric a photograph by her friend Jayne Burton. Bexhill is a seaside town situation in the county of east Sussex in southeast England. We love the breezy, summery effect that Stephanie has created with the shimmering water, the blue sky, and the sunlit clouds. 

Image credits:  Photos were taken by Quilt Inspiration.
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